Can You Quit Medication-Assisted Treatment Without Withdrawals?

Can You Quit Medication-Assisted Treatment Without Withdrawals?

Support for Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) has continued to grow in recent years as the opioid epidemic in America has put a mounting strain on the country. While the numbers of overdoses and opioid-related deaths have steadily climbed to devastating heights there has been more effort to explore treatment options. A better understanding of the medical and mental health aspects of addiction has become a priority. Stigma has slowly begun to carry less weight while advocates push for more effective and supportive routes to care for recovering addicts. One thing people have turned to heavily is medications like Suboxone of Methadone in attempts to steer away from more illicit and dangerous substances like heroin or fentanyl.

The application of medication in treatment can be very useful. It is a strategy that can help with the preservation of life by helping people stay off more unpredictable and life-threatening substances. However, some would say that if used for long-term this form of treatment is still relying on the idea of substitution. Often times these drugs have their own very harsh withdrawal symptoms, especially with extended use.

Taking a look at the more popular drugs used for medication-assisted treatment, one may ask- can you quit medication-assisted treatment with no withdrawals?

Understanding Medication-Assisted Treatment

Medication Assisted Treatment is the use of anti-craving medications to try and help address issues related to drug dependence, withdrawal, and relapse. The more common medications used in MAT include:

But MAT is also utilized alongside comprehensive therapy and other forms of support. Experts and advocates for addiction recovery, including the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), insist that maintenance medications alone are not sufficient enough treatment.

Advocates for medication-assisted treatment will compare MAT to someone taking medication for diabetes or asthma, with the belief that maintenance drugs are an essential part of staying healthy. However, others in the world of addiction recovery still believe it is possible to be healthy in recovery without the prolonged use of powerful medications.

The truth is the answer may not be the same for everybody. Different treatments may be more useful for different people. No one should be ashamed of the method they use to get help. But we also want to look at how some drugs used in medication-assisted treatment might make things more complicated for certain people.

Suboxone

Looking at the most popular maintenance drugs for opioid addiction, of course, we find Suboxone. To better understand Suboxone withdrawals, we first have to know what it is. This popular brand name is used to identify a prescription medication that contains active ingredients:

  • Buprenorphine- a narcotic opioid medication
  • Naloxone– an opioid blocker that impedes the effect of opioid medications

This medication functions as a partial opioid agonist and diminishes cravings as well as prevents other opioids from reacting to the brain’s opioid receptors. Taken in low doses for short periods of time, the drug can be helpful in curbing opioid withdrawal symptoms while tapering off without too many residual effects.

The tricky part comes when someone uses Suboxone for an extended amount of time as a replacement for heroin or other opioids.

Sometimes this can lead to its own form of recreational use and physical dependence. Even the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration reports that Suboxone is commonly susceptible to abuse. It is still a powerful drug.

Suboxone Withdrawal Symptoms

While Suboxone and other maintenance drugs may be a preferred tactic for going ‘cold turkey’ off of heroin or other opioids, the drug itself still has the power to cause its own set of withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms can include:

  • Irritability or agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Profuse sweating
  • Tearing
  • Runny nose
  • Frequent yawning
  • Stomach pain or cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Dilated pupils
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Confusion
  • Changes in mood

Not to mention precipitated withdrawal, when the ingredients in this medication can actually induce the onset of unpleasant symptoms rapidly, if not immediately, for someone actively engaged in opioid use.

Methadone

Methadone is a long-acting opioid medication utilized since the 1970s to try and help people get off of heroin. It is typically used today under strict medical supervision because the drug is very potent and has a high risk of addiction. In fact, a 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health found that approximately 2.46 million people reported to using methadone for a non-prescribed purpose at least once.

According to another study, in 2009 methadone was responsible for 1 out of every 3 opioid overdose deaths.

Because of the risks, a gradual taper should be utilized to wean someone off of methadone. Often times doctors will prescribe another detox medication to help with this process, with the tapering to be done under medical supervision.

Methadone Withdrawal

But as with trying to quit heroin or other powerful opioids ‘cold turkey’, trying to abruptly discontinue methadone can bring on intense withdrawal. This includes physical and psychological symptoms such as:

  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Runny nose
  • Tearing or watery eyes
  • Muscle aches
  • Joint pain
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Shivering
  • Trembling

Many of these symptoms are similar to the symptoms of withdrawing from heroin or other opioids. So in a sense, this drug can create similar withdrawal symptoms as the drugs it is supposed to be used to treat.

Quitting Medication Assisted Treatment

Is it possible to quit medication-assisted treatment- yes, there are always other options for getting comprehensive care and lasting recovery without the prolonged use of these medications. Even relapse prevention is possible without relying on medications to fight cravings.

Can you quit medication-assisted treatment with no withdrawals? Well, that may be a process. It depends on a number of factors, such as the specific maintenance medication and the length of time using it. For example, someone who has been using methadone for years could probably have a much harder time getting off methadone than someone who used another medication for a month or so to help get off opioids.

Safety is crucial when deciding to quit MAT. Quitting medication-assisted treatment without a taper or other forms of medication can cause intense withdrawals. It is not suggested that someone try to quit MAT ‘cold turkey’ or without consulting a doctor for help with changing the dosage and slowly tapering off the drugs.

Again, just because it isn’t heroin or fentanyl doesn’t make it harmless.

MAT or Detox?

Medication-assisted treatment holds a lot of value, but the question becomes whether or not it is the kind of sustainable solution you want. Recovery isn’t one-size-fits-all. Medication-assisted treatment can be helpful in saving someone’s life who cannot stop using drugs. But is it something that will completely eliminate cravings and withdrawals, or will it just postpone these symptoms?

Remember, these are still powerful narcotic drugs that have a high risk for abuse. Some people end up using medication maintenance for life. Others will use it for a short period of time, with a detox period afterward. Either way, it is your choice; how long do you want to rely on substances, and to what extent?

Other models believe in providing holistic treatment and personalized therapy after a detox period, helping to reduce and remove chemical dependence and build a foundation for personal recovery.

Using medication to help with the painful and often overwhelming symptoms of withdrawal from opioids and other drugs can be essential to a smooth and healthy transition. In fact, with a safe medical detox, each individual is given an initial assessment to see what medications will be helpful in making this phase of treatment comfortable and safe. This can include medications for anxiety, mood disorders, physical pains and various other side-effects of substance abuse.

And when it comes to some of these medications, it can sometimes be necessary to continue using them.

The biggest difference is whether narcotic maintenance medications like Suboxone or methadone become a long-term prerequisite to recovery, or if they are used to help someone who is sick get better so that the real healing can happen.

Palm Healthcare Company believes in providing a safe medical detox to allow for a comfortable and healthy transition from active drug or alcohol use. Our facilities utilize an experienced and professional medical staff who help to monitor each individual’s progress and provide effective medical support for lasting recovery. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free now. We want to help.

 CALL NOW 1-888-922-5398

Is Indivior Drug a Revolutionary Opioid Treatment or the Next Suboxone?

Is Indivior Drug a Revolutionary Opioid Treatment or the Next Suboxone?

While the nation is still struggling to find the right strategy to climb out of the opioid crisis in U.S. it seems many are holding onto the idea that Big Pharma is going to save us from the destruction they helped create. While we can agree that evidence-based medical assistance in recovery is a useful tool, some seem to think that the only fix for a pill problem is more pills, or in this case, more needles.

Just recently, after President Trump declared the opioid crisis a “National Health Emergency”, the advisory committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) voted 18-1 that a new injectable drug called RBP-6000 could benefit addicts and the lower of two doses studied had an “acceptable” safety profile.

So what does this mean for the opioid epidemic efforts? Is Indivior a miracle injection that is going to make the epidemic more manageable, or is it another kind of Methadone or Suboxone that is just keeping people hooked?

What is RBP-6000?

For a little background, RBP-6000 is an experimental drug designed to help fight America’s growing opioid addiction crisis. It is described as a sustained-release buprenorphine. It is designed to be delivered once a month as a subcutaneous injection. The compound solidified once in contact with bodily fluids and releases buprenorphine over time.

If approved, it will be the first monthly injectable buprenorphine treatment. When creating the drug the manufacturers studied two dosing regimens.

In one, 300 milligrams were given once a month for six months.

In the other, two doses of 300 milligrams were followed by four doses of 100 milligrams.

According to reports, there was only a minute difference in effectiveness between the two doses, and they drug company acknowledge that the higher dose of RBP-6000 caused more side effects. Looking closely into some of the reports from the research, some side-effects include:

  • Headache

  • Constipation

  • Nausea

  • Injection site pruritus

  • Vomiting

  • Insomnia

  • Upper respiratory tract infection

While these side effects were not noted in an extremely high percentage of those tested, they are still relevant to consider until there is more extensive data available. So far, the report says the safety profile is consistent with that of Suboxone.

So RBP-6000 is like Suboxone using the delivery of Vivitrol; another injectable drug used to try and block the effects of opioids.

Big Pharma Making Big Moves

This is one sign of how Big Pharma is stepping in to make a buck off of the opioid epidemic yet again.

Indivior is the company behind RBP-6000. It was originally part of Reckitt Benckiser as the Buprenorphine division but has since split off to be a specialty pharmaceutical company. Indivior already sells Suboxone Film, a product which combines buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone is a maintenance drug widely used in America to try and curb the effects of opioid addiction and withdrawal, but Suboxone is known to have its own side-effects and withdrawals. Some even attest that Suboxone is itself addictive and very difficult to get off of.

Two months ago the share prices for Indivior took a deep hit after a U.S. court ruling clearing the way for a generic rival to Suboxone Film. So, with new competition on the way in the Suboxone market, Indivior put a renewed focus on another maintenance drug to bring to market.

Some analysts already expect that RBP-6000 could capture around 30% of the broader buprenorphine market. Some believe this new form of injectable buprenorphine could generate annual sales of around $700 million by 2021.

Jefferies sees potential sales of $1.3 billion by 2025.

So now the push for this new drug is boosting its sales prospects as competitors threaten revenues from Suboxone sales.

To learn more about why Suboxone isn’t the easier answer some people think it is, download our FREE E-BOOK

“5 Things No One Tells You About Suboxone”

DOWNLOAD FREE E-BOOK

Waiting for FDA Final Ruling

This endorsement on behalf of RBP-6000 comes less than a week after FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced the agency’s plans to promote extensive use among opioid addicts of less harmful opioids such as methadone and buprenorphine, the active ingredient in RBP-6000.

However, some of the FDA panelists still would like to see more data about which patients should be given the higher dose. Other panelists say they would like to have it available, even though they lack of data supporting any additional benefit of higher doses. So even though the drug is shown to have side-effects in higher doses, and there is limited information on how these side-effects impact the individual, the FDA is considering to let this drug pass the grade.

The FDA’s decision is set to be made by November 30th, although typically the agency follows the recommendations of its advisory panels. So it may very well already be a done deal.

Why It Matters

Again, with respect to the importance of offering alternatives to particularly dangerous opioids like heroin or fentanyl. It is important to have resources for the purpose of preserving of life. Keeping people alive long enough to get help is crucial. But we also have to see that this is not a miracle cure.

Methadone, Suboxone, and Vivitrol may serve a purpose for some in a certain capacity. However, these drugs are not an adequate substitute for comprehensive addiction treatment. Each one of these methods should be accompanied by a holistic treatment plan that addresses all aspect of addiction, including emotional and mental health.

Drugs like RBP-6000 may help subdue the more serious symptoms from the physical side of addiction, but they can also present their own risks.

It is important to offer safe medical assistance, but we have to remember that these Big Pharma companies are not selling us instant cures to opioid addiction. This isn’t even the first time we have seen a new drug come out to try and treat the opioid problem from companies that are closely related or directly responsible for narcotic medications that helped fuel the issue.

Remember, there is not a quick fix for this problem. We cannot prescribe our way out of the problem. It is going to take better treatment resources beyond more medications.

Drugs like RBP-6000 from Indivior are not necessarily a bad thing, but they also may not be the kind of treatment people should focus on. Instead, there are safe medical treatment options that offer holistic resources and mental health services. A lasting recovery begins with effective treatment. If you or someone you love is struggling, please call toll-free now.

 CALL NOW 1-888-922-5398

How to Use Narcan to Stop Opioid Overdose

How to Use Narcan to Stop Opioid Overdose

Narcan is a brand name for the opioid overdose antidote Naloxone hydrochloride. Technically speaking, the opioid antagonist is a synthetic congener of Oxymorphone that is structurally different in that the methyl group on the nitrogen atom is replaced by an allyl group. In the past couple years Narcan has gradually become a household name. With the opioid epidemic in America continuing to ravage many communities across the nation, Narcan has become one of the first lines of defense. For some people, while they know now what this powerful substance is, they are still unsure how to use Narcan to stop an opioid overdose.

NOTE: All instructions in this article come from the Harm Reduction Coalition website. You can also look for Narcan/Naloxone training in your area. Different brands may provide more specific instructions. Be sure to real labels and warnings on Narcan or Naloxone kits. 

How to Use Narcan: More about Narcan

Narcan works by blocking the effects of opioids and can actually reverse an overdose in order to get medical attention to someone who is in need. The life-saving opiate antidote is used for the complete or partial reversal of opioid depression, including respiratory depression. An opioid overdose can cause breathing to slow down or stop completely, putting someone’s life in immediate danger. Some examples of opioid overdoses Narcan may be used to reverse include the drugs:

  • Heroin
  • Morphine
  • Codeine
  • Oxycodone
  • Methadone
  • Vicodin

One major plus is that Narcan has no euphoric effects and cannot get someone “high” so abuse is not an issue. The overdose antidote is essentially harmless if there are no opiods present in someone’s system. If given to a person who has not taken opioids, there will be no effect. Narcan can still be effective when alcohol or other drugs are present with opiates. However, some of the incredibly potent synthetic drugs such as Fentanyl and carfentanil have shown to be somewhat resistant to Narcan treatment, meaning those overdosing due to carfentanil require extra doses to be stabilized.

Administration to opioid-dependent individuals may cause symptoms of opioid withdrawal, including:

  • Restlessness
  • Agitation
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Fast heart rate
  • Sweating

There are other measures that can be taken to help ease these symptoms as well.

How to Use Narcan: Intravenous Infusion

The most rapid onset of action is achieved by intravenous administration, which is recommended in emergency situations. Narcan may be diluted for intravenous infusion in either:

  • Normal saline
  • 5% dextrose solutions

2 mg of Narcan mixed in 500 mL of either solution provides a concentration of 0.004 mg/mL. Narcan should not be mixed with preparations containing:

  • Bisulfite
  • Metabisulfite
  • Long-chain or high molecular weight anions
  • Any solution having an alkaline pH

No drug or chemical agent should be added to the mixture unless its effect on the chemical and physical stability of the solution has first been established. To use the injectable Narcan:

  • If the person is not breathing perform rescue breathing for a few quick breaths.
  • Use a long needle (called an IM or intramuscular needle) which about 1 – 1 ½ inch. NOTE: If there isn’t a big needle, a smaller needle is OK and inject under the skin, but big needles are better.
  • Remove the pop off orange top from the vial
  • Draw up 1cc (1cc=1mL=100u) of antidote into the syringe
  • Inject into a muscle, the best being thighs, upper, outer quadrant of the butt, or shoulder. NOTE: Inject straight in to make sure to hit the muscle.
  • After injection, continue rescue breathing 2-3 minutes.
  • If there is no change in 2-3 minutes, administer another dose and continue to breathe for them.

NOTE: If the second dose of naloxone does not revive them, something else may be wrong—  either it has been too long and the heart has already stopped, there are no opioids in their system, or the opioids are unusually strong and require more naloxone (such as Fentanyl or carfentanil).

For more information, you should be able to find instructions in the Narcan kit, or inquire when picking up a Narcan kit about any opportunities to receive more in-depth training.

How to Use Narcan: Nasal Spray

Another resource that has helped make huge progress in fighting opioid overdose death rates is the Narcan (or Naloxone) nasal spray kit. The variation has made training people to administer the overdose antidote much easier and much less dangerous. Without needles, the nasal spray system helps eliminate the issue of blood contamination.

According to instructions posted through the Harm Reduction Coalition, there are about 5 steps for how to use Narcan with nasal spray.

  1. If the individual is not breathing perform rescue breathing for a few quick breaths.
  2. Attach the nasal atomizer (applicator) to the needleless syringe and assemble the glass cartridge of naloxone.
  3. Tilt the head back and spray half of the naloxone up one side of the nose (1cc) and half up the other side of the nose (1cc).
  4. If there is no breathing or breathing continues to be shallow, continue to perform rescue breathing for them while waiting for the naloxone to take effect.
  5. If after about 3 to 5 minutes there is no change, administer another dose of naloxone and continue to breathe for them.

NOTE: If the second dose of naloxone does not revive them, something else is wrong—either it has been too long and the heart has already stopped, there are no opioids in their system, or the opioids are unusually strong and require more naloxone (such as Fentanyl or carfentanil).

Regardless of if you use an intravenous Narcan kit or a nasal spray kit, Narcan should never be used as substitute for emergency medical care. In the event of an opioid overdose one should always call 911 right away, even if the individual wakes up. Narcan can wear off between 30-90 minutes, while the effects of the opioids can last much longer. It is possible that after Narcan wears off the overdose can return.

Also look into Narcan training programs in your area.

How to Use Narcan: Get More Help

When someone has to be revived from an opioid overdose it can be a pretty clear cut indication that something needs to be done in order to help them stay safe.

Another difficult aspect of how to use Narcan is that naloxone can cause uncomfortable opioid withdrawals. Because Narcan blocks the action of opioids in the brain, people can wake up feeling withdrawals practically immediately and try to use again. Of course this could result in another overdose.

Beyond administering Narcan to save someone’s life, take this as an opportunity to seek resources and start a conversation about getting them the help they need. Preserving life is important, but saving a life by changing a life can make a world of difference. There are empowering and innovative addiction treatment programs that specialize in addressing this chronic, progressive and fatal substance use disorder. After surviving an overdose presenting someone with the opportunity to get treatment may be the best chance they get.

Holistic addiction treatment allows people who were once hopeless build the foundation of hope again. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call Palm Healthcare Company. We want to help.

CALL NOW 1-888-922-5398

What Is A Methadone Clinic?

What Is A Methadone Clinic?

Ever since Methadone was introduced to combat opioid dependence, it has been leaned on by countless people over several decades to treat opioid abuse. For a long time methadone clinics have been looked to as a source of relief from an addiction to opioids, but are they as effective as people seem to think? Over time more people who have used methadone to try overcoming serious addictions have realized methadone maintenance also comes with a great deal of damaging side effects.

What is a methadone clinic?

A methadone clinic is a clinic for the dispensing of methadone. Because this is a schedule II opioid analgesic drug, access must be restricted. Methadone clinics are a way to provide people with this medication. But before you rush out to find the one closest to you, there are a lot of things to consider.

What is a Methadone Clinic: History of Methadone

Firstly, let us not that methadone is an opioid drug. It is used to treat pain, like most opioid medications, but most people know it as a maintenance drug for detoxing from dependence on other opioids, such as heroin. Methadone, sold under many brand names, including:

  • Methadose
  • Dolophine
  • Symoron
  • Amidone
  • Physeptone
  • Diskets

Different countries have different brands as well. A few footnotes of the history of methadone include:

  • 1937 to 1939

Methadone was developed in Germany by Gustav Ehrhart and Max Bockmühl.

  • 1947

The United States approved the use of Methadone.

  • 2013

About 41.400 kilograms of methadone were manufactured globally

What is a Methadone Clinic: Methadone Detox

Methadone is available in various forms, including:

  • Pill
  • Sublingual tablet
  • Two different formulations designed for the patient to drink

Drinkable forms include:

  • Methadose- the ready-to-dispense liquid form found in theUnited States.
  • Diskets- tablets designed to work like Alka-Seltzer, dispersing rapidly in water for oral administration.

The most common method of administration is the liquid form, because it allows for small dose changes. Methadone is almost as effective when administered orally as by injection.

Detoxification using methadone is intended to be a way for people addicted to opioids such as heroin or powerful prescription drugs to taper off, but at the same time detoxification using methadone has been met with a great deal of controversy.

Many who oppose methadone clinics refer to this strategy as methadone substitution. As a treatment of opioid addiction methadone is heavily criticized for its role in what some call “social control of addicts.” Many who oppose methadone suggested that the drug does not function as much to curb addiction as to redirect it and maintain dependency. In other words, some insist methadone is essentially keeping people addicted, but making sure the money goes to drug manufactures and methadone clinics instead of street dealers.

What is a Methadone Clinic: Methadone Side-Effects

There are so many adverse effects of methadone, which may vary in range and severity depending on the individual. There include, but are not limited to:

  • Sedation
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Perspiration
  • Heat intolerance
  • Dizziness
  • Fainting
  • Itching
  • Weakness
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Sleep problems
  • Nausea
  • Hallucinations
  • Memory Loss
  • Weight gain
  • Stomach pains
  • Mood changes
  • Restlessness
  • Decreased libido or impotence
  • Urinary difficulty
  • Blurred vision
  • Skin rash
  • Low blood pressure
  • Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Heart problems
  • Respiratory problems

Some of these adverse effects of methadone use are much more serious than others.

What is a Methadone Clinic: Withdrawal Symptoms

There is also a massive list of possible withdrawal symptoms from using methadone. This is one of the primary issues many people have with methadone treatment.

Physical withdrawals include:

  • Runny nose and sneezing
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Sweating
  • Chills
  • Aches and pains (especially in joints)
  • Sensitivity to pain
  • Hyperventilation
  • Tremors
  • High blood pressure that may cause strokes

Others are more concerned with the mental aspect of the withdrawals experienced from methadone.

Cognitive withdrawals include:

  • Suicidal ideation
  • Drug cravings
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Delirium
  • Hallucinations (auditory and visual)
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Panic disorder
  • Paranoia
  • Delusions
  • Apathy

The irony is that methadone withdrawal symptoms are even reported to last significantly longer than withdrawals from some other opioids. In some cases, people may even try to treat an opioid addiction with this drug not knowing that it is actually a much worse opioid to withdrawal from.

What is a Methadone Clinic: Methadone Overdose

As mentioned before, there are some very real dangers when it comes to using methadone.

  • Between 1999 and 2004, deaths in the U.S. linked to methadone quadrupled.
  • In 2004 reports credit methadone as contributing to 3,849 deaths, 82% of which were reported as accidental.
  • In 2011, there were 4,418 deaths in the United States involving methadone. At the time that made up 26% of total deaths fromopioid poisoning.

Respiratory depression is probably the most common overdose risk related to opioid drugs. Other symptoms of a methadone overdose include:

  • Hypoventilation (slow/shallow breathing)
  • Drowsiness
  • Cool, clammy skin
  • Limp muscles
  • Unconsciousness
  • Coma
  • Excessive vomiting
  • Risks are greater with higher doses, as well as mixing methadone with any other drugs.

The risks of methadone are very, very real. In fact, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Public Health Advisory back in 2006 about methadone titled “Methadone Use for Pain Control May Result in Death and Life-Threatening Changes in Breathing and Heart Beat”. In the report, the FDA stated that they received reports of death and life-threatening side effects with patients who were newly starting methadone.

Both individuals who were starting methadone for pain, or who were trying to switch to it from another powerful narcotic pain reliever were included to be at an elevated risk, according to the FDA.

What is a Methadone Clinic: Another Way

Getting off of powerful opioid drugs, whether they are prescription narcotics or illicit street drugs, is possible without the use of methadone. While maintenance drugs can be useful to some extent as a means of harm reduction, these should not be considered as sustainable means of addiction recovery. Maintenance drugs are typically only ever effective if utilized in combination with therapy and other forms of addiction treatment.

Luckily there are other ways to get help. It is possible to be safely and effectively removed from a methadone taper through a safe medical detox. Understanding methadone can also be fatal is of vital significance. Methadone detox can be deadly if not supported by a medical staff with the right medications to help ease the pain and discomfort of the detox. Medical detox combined with a holistic treatment program is a proven strategy for saving lives.

If you or someone you love is struggling, do not wait. Please call toll-free now. We want to help. You are not alone.

CALL NOW 1-888-922-5398

Can I Detox From Drugs at Home?

Can I Detox From Drugs at Home?

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

When it comes to overcoming a serious drug addiction it is essential to start strong on the road to recovery with a healthy and stable foundation. With most substances detoxing is not particularly fatal, but there are some drugs that can cause life-threaten detox symptoms without consistent medical care. So when people ask- can I detox from drugs at home- it is technically possible to go “cold turkey”, but chances are it’s going to be extremely painful and in some cases is far too dangerous to risk.

Detoxing from drugs in a safe medical environment is worth the effort for multiple reasons, regardless if you could technically survive the detox on your own, and especially when withdrawals could become lethal.
Sustainable and fulfilling sobriety means consistent work on both the physical and the mental and emotion aspects of addiction. Drugs and alcohol are not the only symptom to addiction; and overcoming withdrawal is not the only benefit of safe medical detox.
You may still be struggling to accept that it isn’t a matter of pure willpower. Maybe you are a parent or family member who just wants to help your loved one. Either way some people resist reaching out for help. Still, the truth is that trying to detox at home isn’t just an unnecessary risk, it can also be incredibly dangerous or even fatal.

Can I Detox From Drugs at Home: Withdrawals

The fear of the pain and discomfort of withdrawal symptoms is often the primary reason why most people never get a fair shot at getting off of drugs. A lot of people end up trying to figure out how to detox from drugs at home, but many find themselves being unsuccessful because of the difficulties they face and the lack of support. Some of the more general withdrawal symptoms people experience when coming off of drugs includes:

  •  Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Panic attacks
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Disturbed sleep
  • Headache
  • Heart palpitations
  • Tremors
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • Muscle pain
  • Hypertension
  • Irregular heart rate

Of course, some drugs are more powerful and thus more damaging. If someone tries to detox at home “cold turkey” from certain substances they may accidentally cause serious damage to their body and/or vital organs.

When asking- can I detox from drugs at home- we also have to consider any pre-existing conditions, or conditions that may have been created through long-term drug use. There are also medical complications during the detox process that most cannot diagnose or treat at home.
Some drug withdrawals can actually kill. Alcohol withdrawals are extremely dangerous, and abruptly stopping some drugs without medical monitoring and assistance is especially hazardous. Ultimately, the specific substance, the length of use and the severity/frequency of use will determine how difficult the detox process will be.

Can I Detox From Drugs at Home: Maintenance Drugs

Again, the difficulty of the detox process can be physically overwhelming. One way people try to fight the withdrawal symptoms from home is by using maintenance drugs, such as:

If you would like more information on Suboxone, download our free E-book: 5 Things No One Tells You about Suboxone.

DOWNLOAD FREE E-BOOK

While these can be useful elements of treatment, often times these methods are unsustainable in the long-term. Some maintenance drugs like Suboxone have side-effects and withdrawal symptoms of their own, which pretty much defeats the purpose.
With methadone people visit clinics to receive doses of a maintenance drug that also is well known for its own horrible withdrawal symptoms.
In the end, those who practice in the field of addiction treatment the medical community agree that these drugs are only ever useful when accompanied by cognitive behavioral therapy or comprehensive addiction treatment. They should not be used as an extended solution to a more complex issue.

Can I Detox From Drugs at Home: Behavioral Therapy

If you’re asking, “can I detox from drugs at home?” then you are probably forgetting one of the most important parts of addiction treatment. Beyond getting through the physical side of detox, there is so much more to recovering from drugs.
While most people think of detox as just the first stages of trying to get clean, there are still opportunities to lay the ground work for continued growth and personal development. Having the time away from the influences of the outside world, you can focus on beginning to change addictive behaviors in a secure facility.

Behavioral therapy and other holistic treatment methods are crucial ways of starting off on a path to recovery from drugs and alcohol. Creating new coping skills and confronting underlying issues can be the key to moving forward progressively while also preventing relapse.

Can I Detox From Drugs at Home: Safe Medical Detox

Addiction treatment professionals agree that detoxing from drugs should always be done with the supervision and support of a trained and experienced medical staff.

People do attempt detoxing from home, but it is still an unnecessary level of discomfort and risk. People do also die from trying to detox from dangerous drugs at home without the proper support. It is important to stress why even though it may be ‘possible’ to try detoxing from drugs at home, it can also be deadly. There are more than enough resources out there, and people willing to help.

At Palm Healthcare we believe in providing drug and alcohol detox with 24-hour assistance from an experienced medical staff to continuously evaluate individual progress, administer the appropriate levels of medications and provide unlimited support during this process. Our highly qualified specialists genuinely strive to make recovery possible for everyone who needs help. If your or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free.

CALL NOW 1-888-922-5398

Pin It on Pinterest